We have broken HTTP. We’ve done it for years in fits and starts, but apps have completely broken it. HTTP was a good specification which we’ve steadily whittled away.

URLs have a purpose. We are very cavalier about that purpose. We don’t use canonicals. We’re sloppy about switching back and forth between HTTP and HTTPs. We don’t bother to logically structure our URLs. We rebuild websites and let all the links break. We don’t appreciate that crawlers are dumb and they need more context than humans.

The author goes on to complain about the misuse of HTTP methods and status codes as if he had never heard of REST APIs. Overall, though, he makes some good points.

So, I’ve been doing my research. Because there are so many prefectures and so many famous foods, I’m going to be breaking this article up into two parts. One for North, East, and Central prefectures of Japan, and one for West and South prefectures of Japan. At the end of the second part, we’ll also include a printout that has a map with numbers on all the prefectures corresponding to a list down below it. That way you can print this out, take it with you, and go on a rompy food excursion in Japan.

Each prefecture will be given 3 famous foods with the exception of a few (like Hokkaido, which is really, really big and tasty). While there are many other famous foods in every single prefecture, these are the ones that seemed to be the most famous.

Supposedly, git-svn can also be used to convert a Subversion repo to Git. Unfortunately, after reading the git-svn docs carefully and several useful resources (like the slightly-obscure Git FAQ, the Git Community Book, Paul Dowman’s blog and Alexis Midon’s blog), it became apparent that all the resources are piecemeal and nothing gives you the BIG HONKIN’ PICTURE. So here it is, ponies and all…

You may have heard that the NSA can decrypt SSH at least some of the time. If you have not, then read the latest batch of Snowden documents now. All of it. This post will still be here when you finish. My goal with this post here is to make NSA analysts sad.

TL;DR: Scan this post for fixed width fonts, these will be the config file snippets and commands you have to use.

Although there are a few different public-key encryption algorithms, the most popular — and fortunately, the easiest to understand — is the RSA algorithm, named after its three inventors Rivest, Shamir and Adelman. To apply the RSA algorithm, you must find three numbers e, d and n related such that ((m^e)^d) % n = m. Here, e and n comprise the public key and d is the private key. When one party wishes to send a message in confidence to the holder of the private key, he computes and transmits c = (m^e) % n. The recipient then recovers the original message m using m = (c^d) % n.

Happy new year everyone!

Microservices one of these ideas that are nice in practice, but all manner of complexity comes out when it meets reality. For this reason, I wanted to write this article to capture some of these and redress the balance.

And now being visited by aliens.

Looks like somebody’s home.

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