@lastfm #RSS feeds return 404. Temporary problem? Permanently broken? Deliberately removed (but still linked to in API section of site)?

It may come as an even greater surprise that bushido once received more recognition abroad than in Japan. In 1900 writer Inazo Nitobe's published Bushido: The Soul of Japan in English, for the Western audience. Nitobe subverted fact for an idealized imagining of Japan's culture and past, infusing Japan's samurai class with Christian values in hopes of shaping Western interpretations of his country.

Though initially rejected in Japan, Nitobe's ideology would be embraced by a government driven war machine. Thanks to its empowering vision of the past, the extreme nationalist movement embraced bushido, exploiting The Soul of Japan to pave Japan's way to fascism in the buildup to World War II.

This article outlines the scale of that codebase and details Google's custom-built monolithic source repository and the reasons the model was chosen. Google uses a homegrown version-control system to host one large codebase visible to, and used by, most of the software developers in the company. This centralized system is the foundation of many of Google's developer workflows. Here, we provide background on the systems and workflows that make feasible managing and working productively with such a large repository. We explain Google's "trunk-based development" strategy and the support systems that structure workflow and keep Google's codebase healthy, including software for static analysis, code cleanup, and streamlined code review.

The descriptions of the signs mostly follow Gardiner's publications. However, an attempt was made to achieve a greater consistency.

Under water. (at Mälaren)

Good thing they introduced that new "facepalm" Unicode character just in time for the #Brexit poll result. https://t.co/yddiAHaaZr

This service uses linguistic analysis to detect and interpret emotions, social tendencies, and language style cues found in text.

Our extensive use of Perl to build many of our internal services often comes as a surprise to many and we can understand why. Perl is a dinosaur among mainstream programming languages. It lacks the glamour that other, relatively younger languages have. There is also a common misconception in the programming world that modern software engineering practices cannot be followed with a language like Perl. In this post, we hope to debunk that myth. We want to give you a glimpse of the developer experience (DX) here at Semantics3 where we write a lot of Perl code but still manage to employ the latest engineering best-practices. We would like to highlight that we are able to do so with the help of a tool-chain written entirely in Perl.

Starting with Docker 1.12, we have added features to the core Docker Engine to make multi-host and multi-container orchestration easy.

We’ve added new API objects, like Service and Node, that will let you use the Docker API to deploy and manage apps on a group of Docker Engines called a swarm. With Docker 1.12, the best way to orchestrate Docker is Docker!

This is a long — sorry not sorry! — written piece specifically about the high-level aspects of deployment: collaboration, safety, and pace. There's plenty to be said for the low-level aspects as well, but those are harder to generalize across languages and, to be honest, a lot closer to being solved than the high-level process aspects. I love talking about how teams work together, and deployment is one of the most critical parts of working with other people. I think it's worth your time to evaluate how your team is faring, from time to time.

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