Nobody has ever implemented an OAuth flow for their application and then said, “That was fun. Let’s do it again.”

Don’t believe me? Just go to Twitter and search for “OAuth Sucks”. Or just search “OAuth”. Or best of all just follow the OAuthSucks Twitter account. It’s a sentiment that’s so common, it has it’s own Twitter account. How did I find this account? I tried to register it of course.

But why is OAuth so awful? And does it have to be this way? In this post, we’ll take a look. OAuth (2.0 specifically) has a litany of problems, starting with the fact that the 2.0 spec itself essentially allows anything to be considered “OAuth compliant”.

Stream allows you to build scalable newsfeed and activity streams in hours instead of weeks. The documentation will get you up and running quickly. At the moment we have official clients for Ruby, JS/Node, Python, PHP and Java. Furthermore there are also example apps and Framework integrations available for Rails, Django and Laravel.

Gmail represents a dying class of products that, like Google Reader, puts control in the hands of users, not signal-harvesting algorithms.


Facy, posted Oct '14 by peter in communication free ruby shell social software

Facy is a terminal client for facebook, which support streaming-like feature. Only supports Ruby 1.9 and later. To install facy, we need ruby pre-installed, please refer to to know how to install ruby. I recommend rvm to control the version of installed ruby.

A smart and nice Twitter client on terminal wrote by Python.

When Edward Snowden exposed the scale and depth of the National Security Agency's surveillance programs, his findings led to another disheartening revelation: that our Internet has become too centralized. Webmail services like Yahoo and Google and social networks like Facebook and Twitter are convenient and efficient platforms, as well as easy to use, but they collect massive amounts of user data that can facilitate intelligence spying and other types of snooping. Meanwhile, securer methods of communication are often cumbersome and overly technical for the average user who would like to send an email without having to download and set up various software. Yet after Snowden’s leaks, an increasing demand for securer alternatives has led to the development of anti-surveillance products with an eye towards being user friendly.

That is certainly true for Miguel Freitas, a research engineer based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, who decided to create a decentralized alternative to Twitter to counter NSA spying and protect against shutdowns of social media sites; but it would also be “something that my grandmother could use,” Freitas tells techPresident.

Did you ever wish to have all relevant information about a visitor right when he hits your site? Think of (full) name, gender and maybe hobbies and interests? Thanks to social networks we could at least get some of that data. All you need is the URL to that visitors (public) Facebook or Google+ profile – but if he doesn’t actively give it to you, you’re probably out of luck.

What if we could get that profile URL without the user even noticing it?

The tweet.IM service sits between your Jabber or Google@Talk instant messaging account and your Twitter account and passes messages to and from, in both directions. As a result, you can create Twitter messages in your instant messaging application and send them direct to Twitter, without having to enter your Twitter account. You can also elect to receive tweets from users that you follow, directly in your instant messenger.

Facebook launched a Japanese version of its website in 2008. Initially, the platform experienced sluggish user growth as it struggled to compete with already established Japanese SNS sites produced by the likes of mixi, Mobage, and GREE. However, after well-known companies in Japan began to use Facebook as a marketing tool, it caught on with the general public and by the end of 2012 had 17.12 million users. A mere five months later, however, that number has dropped to 13.78 million, a 19.5 percent drop in less than half a year.

There’s a strong case to be made that as Facebook and Twitter have amassed such huge user bases we should take advantage of the fact that so many of their users are already logged in and just one click away from entering your app. I know that argument all too well, because I made it to my colleagues. We tried that experiment, and found that while there are some marginal improvements to login failure rate, they come with a price. Do you want to NASCAR-up your login page? Do you want to have your users’ login credentials stored in a third-party service? Do you want your brand closely associated with other brands, over which you have no control? Do you want to add additional confusion about login methods on your app? Is it worth it? Nope, it’s not to us.

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