These experiences will help you understand who the Japanese people are, and why they act the way they do. Get ready to move from tourist to cultural expert after the jump!

I've done about half of these so I guess I'm about half-way between "tourist" and "cultural expert".

Google Inc. on Wednesday released new Street View images showing the present condition of the Tohoku region devastated by the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami as the country marked the fourth anniversary of the disaster, which left more than 18,000 people dead or missing.

The U.S. company posted pictures taken since November 2014 online as part of a project launched in 2011 with the aim of keeping the memories of the disaster from fading.

Sekai Menu (meaning “World Menu” in English), provides multi-language localization of food and beverage menus via QR codes placed around partner restaurants. Users can simply scan the code and place their order via smartphone or tablet, ensuring that neither party gets lost in translation.

New Japanese words every day, with kana, romaji and kanji. And colorful pictures, just in case.

So, I’ve been doing my research. Because there are so many prefectures and so many famous foods, I’m going to be breaking this article up into two parts. One for North, East, and Central prefectures of Japan, and one for West and South prefectures of Japan. At the end of the second part, we’ll also include a printout that has a map with numbers on all the prefectures corresponding to a list down below it. That way you can print this out, take it with you, and go on a rompy food excursion in Japan.

Each prefecture will be given 3 famous foods with the exception of a few (like Hokkaido, which is really, really big and tasty). While there are many other famous foods in every single prefecture, these are the ones that seemed to be the most famous.

An online dictionary to look up Japanese compound verbs (e.g., 仰ぐ "look up to" + ‹‹ "see" = 仰ぎ‹‹ "lift one's head and look up").

Why has the “Made in Germany” brand thrived over the last 15 or so years, even as “Made in Japan” grinds toward irrelevance? All the more extraordinary, Germany has flourished in a savagely competitive global environment despite high labor costs, an overvalued euro and any number of regional financial crises. Its secret: adapting and innovating in ways Japan Inc. cannot even seem to contemplate.

Science journalist Ranga Yogeshwar has gained extensive access to Japan's battered Fukushima power plant. He speaks to DW about exploring radiation-contaminated zones, and how the cleanup has progressed so far.

An unconventional home requires an unconventional client, one who’s willing to take-on, or can afford to ignore, one or more types of risk: privacy, comfort, efficiency, aesthetics, etc. But Japan’s experimental commissions aren’t necessarily luxury villas for a wealthy cultural elite. Many are small middle-class homes, not a typology where we expect to find bold avant garde design. So, what is it about Japan that encourages such everyday risk taking?

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