Melrose is both a language and a tool to create and listen to music interactively, The language uses musical primitives (note, sequence, chord) and many functions (map, group, transpose) that can be used to create more complex patterns, loops and tracks. Melrose uses MIDI output to produce sound by any (hard or software) device attached. Melrose can also react on MIDI inputs to start, record and stop playing musical objects. A plugin is available for Microsoft Visual Studio for the best usage experience. For a quickstart, without any installation, you can use the Melrose playground.

If you live in a fake world long enough, it can start to feel real. Dictators and despots begin to believe their own lies, repeated back at them and propagated by state-controlled media. That might help explain why Putin's recent speeches have stood out as unhinged rants. It's certainly possible that his mind has succumbed to his own propaganda, creating a warped worldview in which the invasion of Ukraine was, as Trump put it, an incredibly "savvy" move.

Blaming America first became all too easy. After September 11, U.S. power was as overwhelming as it was uncontested. That it was squandered on two endless wars made it convenient to focus on America's sins, while underplaying Russia's and China's growing ambitions.

The basic insight behind Levenshtein automata is that it's possible to construct a Finite state automaton that recognizes exactly the set of strings within a given Levenshtein distance of a target word. We can then feed in any word, and the automaton will accept or reject it based on whether the Levenshtein distance to the target word is at most the distance specified when we constructed the automaton. Further, due to the nature of FSAs, it will do so in O(n) time with the length of the string being tested. Compare this to the standard Dynamic Programming Levenshtein algorithm, which takes O(mn) time, where m and n are the lengths of the two input words! It's thus immediately apparrent that Levenshtein automaton provide, at a minimum, a faster way for us to check many words against a single target word and maximum distance - not a bad improvement to start with!

Of course, if that were the only benefit of Levenshtein automata, this would be a short article. There's much more to come, but first let's see what a Levenshtein automaton looks like, and how we can build one.

I was under a common engineer misapprehension that BFE [Big Freaking Enterprise] sales requires playing golf, inviting clients to steak dinners, and having budgets beyond to reach of small businesses. This is not 100% true: you can hack the BFE procurement process to your advantage. Let's dig into how.

eBooks from Amazon are locked down and distributed in a way that is hostile to both authors and readers. You don't own the book. You cannot lend the book. Renting Kindle-compatible eBooks from the library is arduous and limited by artificial constraints; you literally need to return a book before another person can rent it.

When I want to search an Amazon eBook that I "own", I have to log onto Amazon's cloud computer. Further, the open .epub eBook format is not compatible with the Kindle; readers must use Amazon's .mobi file format. Some .mobi files are incompatible with my device, but I have only discovered which ones after I purchase. I cannot even highlight my purchased Amazon eBooks without running into usage violations. Highlight lengths have arbitrary limitations.

RSA is an intrinsically fragile cryptosystem containing countless foot-guns which the average software engineer cannot be expected to avoid. Weak parameters can be difficult, if not impossible, to check, and its poor performance compels developers to take risky shortcuts. Even worse, padding oracle attacks remain rampant 20 years after they were discovered. While it may be theoretically possible to implement RSA correctly, decades of devastating attacks have proven that such a feat may be unachievable in practice.

Try to get through 8 levels by moving in all 4 spacial [sic] dimensions and reach your spaceship.

A cube is one of the simplest solids one can imagine. Over the course of this article I'll try to explain how to expand it to the next dimension to obtain a tesseract -- a 4D equivalent of a cube.

This as been a challenge for the crypto back market. It's easy to get dirty money into crypto, but getting a significant amount out is hard. Most governments classify crypto as a security, so crypto exchanges must follow the same KYC laws as banks.

NFTs solve this problem nicely.

...

NFTs are instruments that act like securities, but are not regulated as securities.

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