Är du nyfiken på programmering och digitalt skapande? Kodboken är sajten för dig som vill komma igång med kod.

Verkar ha en del övningar bland annat i att skapa musik och spel i Scratch. Värt att kolla på.

This series of posts is about the Commodore Amiga. Thousands of words have already been written on the Amiga, and I will not add anything but "milestone" to the adjectives used to describe it. This post and the following ones are not intended to be a complete and well-organised review of the architecture. Instead, they will be more a set of "lab notes" for myself that I write while I explore the platform. I put them on the blog in the hope that they will be useful for other programmers that try to crack the same problems.

The goal of this project is to create a universal database of disallowed usernames for web applications. This repository contains a list of keywords that should be banned/disallowed to prevent users from registering with, on your software projects and apps to prevent impersonation and phishing on your platform.

The goal of this article is to provide a historical context of how JavaScript tools have evolved to what they are today in 2017. We’ll start from the beginning and build an example website like the dinosaurs did — no tools, just plain HTML and JavaScript. Then we’ll introduce different tools incrementally to see the problems that they solve one at a time. With this historical context, you’ll be better able to learn and adapt to the ever-changing JavaScript landscape going forward. Let’s get started!

A target image is provided as input. The algorithm tries to find the single most optimal shape that can be drawn to minimize the error between the target image and the drawn image. It repeats this process, adding one shape at a time. Around 50 to 200 shapes are needed to reach a result that is recognizable yet artistic and abstract.

In my first decade writing Makefiles, I developed the bad habit of liberally using GNU Make’s extensions. I didn’t know the line between GNU Make and the portable features guaranteed by POSIX. Usually it didn’t matter much, but it would become an annoyance when building on non-Linux systems, such as on the various BSDs. I’d have to specifically install GNU Make, then remember to invoke it (i.e. as gmake) instead of the system’s make.

I’ve since become familiar and comfortable with make’s official specification, and I’ve spend the last year writing strictly portable Makefiles. Not only has are my builds now portable across all unix-like systems, my Makefiles are cleaner and more robust. Many of the common make extensions — conditionals in particular — lead to fragile, complicated Makefiles and are best avoided anyway. It’s important to be able to trust your build system to do its job correctly.

This tutorial should be suitable for make beginners who have never written their own Makefiles before, as well as experienced developers who want to learn how to write portable Makefiles.

Hello! This is part one of a short series of posts on writing a simple raytracer in Rust. I’ve never written one of these before, so it should be a learning experience all around.

This is part one of a short series of posts on writing a simple raytracer in Rust. I’ve never written one of these before, so it should be a learning experience all around.

Every line of code has some probability of having an undetected flaw that will be seen in production. Process can affect that probability, but it cannot make it zero. Large diffs contain many lines, and therefore have a high probability of breaking when given real data and real traffic.

Welcome to fast.ai’s 7 week course, Practical Deep Learning For Coders, Part 1, taught by Jeremy Howard (Kaggle’s #1 competitor 2 years running, and founder of Enlitic). Learn how to build state of the art models without needing graduate-level math—but also without dumbing anything down. Oh and one other thing… it’s totally free!

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