The USB Weather Data Receiver USB-WDE1 wirelessly receives data from various weather sensors of ELV at 868 MHz. The receiver is connected to a USB port on the computer, so no additional power supply is required. The data is transmitted via a simple serial ASCII protocol, which is well documented by ELV. The RasberryPi running Raspbian is used for the data acquisition allowing very little power consumption while being completely flexible.

If you've ever used git bisect, you know what an incredibly useful tool this is. It allows you to do a binary search through commits to find out which commit caused a particular error. Many people seem unaware of git bisect run ... which automates this even further, but it has a limitation: it won't let you find a particular error, it detects success or failure, that's all. So I decided to do something about that.

Backupninja allows you to coordinate system backup by dropping a few simple configuration files into /etc/backup.d/. Most programs you might use for making backups don't have their own configuration file format. Backupninja provides a centralized way to configure and schedule many different backup utilities. It allows for secure, remote, incremental filesytem backup (via rdiff-backup), compressed incremental data, backup system and hardware info, encrypted remote backups (via duplicity), safe backup of MySQL/PostgreSQL databases, subversion or trac repositories, burn CD/DVDs or create ISOs, incremental rsync with hardlinking.

They’re not just used by behavioural scientists: a Skinner box can be a useful device for training pets, especially pets with a reasonable amount of smarts, like parrots or rats. It can automate the process you may have already used with your pet, where “correct” behaviour is rewarded – walk to heel, get a doggy snack.

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Skinner boxes are also pretty expensive. So Katherine Scott, computer vision and robotics expert, electronics ninja and rat owner/trainer, has built her own, which she intends to release as an open source device when she’s finished refining it.

Skipfish is an active web application security reconnaissance tool. It prepares an interactive sitemap for the targeted site by carrying out a recursive crawl and dictionary-based probes. The resulting map is then annotated with the output from a number of active (but hopefully non-disruptive) security checks. The final report generated by the tool is meant to serve as a foundation for professional web application security assessments.

Mock your HTTP responses to test your REST API.

Programmer and CMU PhD Tom Murphy created a function to “beat” NES games by watching the score. When the computer did things that raised the score it would learn how to reproduce them again and again, resulting, ultimately, in what amounts to a Super Mario Brothers-playing robot. The program, called a “technique for automating NES games,” can take on nearly every NES game, but it doesn’t always win. [Pretty cool. Reminds me of when I hex-edited saved games in Snake in the 1980s to simulate playing the game "perfectly".]

Welcome! Quantopian is building the world’s first algorithmic trading platform in your browser. We provide tools and infrastructure for you to learn, create, and test trading strategies - while protecting your intellectual property. Your algorithms are yours and kept private.

Docker encapsulates heterogeneous payloads in Standard Containers, and runs them on any server with strong guarantees of isolation and repeatability. It is a great building block for automating distributed systems: large-scale web deployments, database clusters, continuous deployment systems, private PaaS, service-oriented architectures, etc.

We all like to build software which is reliable, but every once in a while it seems like a good idea to demo something still in it's unreliable infancy. Google Chrome has a little known feature which can help. Record modes let you record every request Chrome makes. Playback mode serves requests out of that recorded cache just as if they were being loaded on the spot. It doesn't record where you click or what you open, just every request as it moves over the wire.

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