In its simplest form, git worktree add <path> automatically creates a new branch whose name is the final component of <path>, which is convenient if you plan to work on a new topic. For instance, git worktree add ../hotfix creates new branch hotfix and checks it out at path ../hotfix. To instead work on an existing branch in a new worktree, use git worktree add <path> <branch>. On the other hand, if you just plan to make some experimental changes or do testing without disturbing existing development, it is often convenient to create a throwaway worktree not associated with any branch. For instance, git worktree add -d <path> creates a new worktree with a detached HEAD at the same commit as the current branch.

If a working tree is deleted without using git worktree remove, then its associated administrative files, which reside in the repository (see "DETAILS" below), will eventually be removed automatically (see gc.worktreePruneExpire in git-config[1]), or you can run git worktree prune in the main or any linked worktree to clean up any stale administrative files.

The Conventional Commits specification is a lightweight convention on top of commit messages. It provides an easy set of rules for creating an explicit commit history; which makes it easier to write automated tools on top of. This convention dovetails with SemVer, by describing the features, fixes, and breaking changes made in commit messages.

The Configuration as Code plugin is an opinionated way to configure Jenkins based on human-readable declarative configuration files. Writing such a file should be feasible without being a Jenkins expert, just translating into code a configuration process one is used to executing in the web UI.

Palisade works by reading two files in the root of your repository:

  • A CHANGELOG.md file that describes the changes made to the program
  • A VERSION file that contains the current version of the program (ideally following semantic versioning)

Every time Palisade is run, it will check the git repository for version tags based on the contents of the VERSION file. If it finds that the current version has already been tagged, Palisade will do nothing and exit with the exit code 0. If Palisade finds that there is a new release, the software will then read the changelog file, scrape it for release notes, then use those release notes when creating a new release on GitHub.

This article outlines the scale of that codebase and details Google's custom-built monolithic source repository and the reasons the model was chosen. Google uses a homegrown version-control system to host one large codebase visible to, and used by, most of the software developers in the company. This centralized system is the foundation of many of Google's developer workflows. Here, we provide background on the systems and workflows that make feasible managing and working productively with such a large repository. We explain Google's "trunk-based development" strategy and the support systems that structure workflow and keep Google's codebase healthy, including software for static analysis, code cleanup, and streamlined code review.

GitHub is the go-to place to host your open source projects, that much is well known. A lot of companies also use their paid plans to get the ecosystem around GitHub for their own code. Why would you want to use anything else? We took the decision to move away from GitHub and in the end we benefitted hugely!

Acts as a proxy for incoming webhooks between your Git hosting provider and your continuous integration server.

When a Git commit webhook is received, the repository in question will be mirrored locally (or updated, if it already exists), and then the webhook will be passed on to your CI server, where it can start a build, using the up-to-date local mirror.

This tutorial demonstrates how to apply changes made to a project hosted in one git repository onto a completely separate project in a different git repository: essentially, merging changes between two totally separate git repositories. If you don't use git, this will likely not interest you much.

The Collective Code Construction Contract (C4) is an evolution of the github.com Fork + Pull Model, aimed at providing an optimal collaboration model for free software projects. This is revision 1 of the C4 specification.

Ashish Kumar presents how Google manages to keep the source code of all its projects, over 2000, in a single code trunk containing hundreds of millions of code lines, with more than 5,000 developers accessing the same repository.

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