Arquillian is an innovative and highly extensible testing platform for the JVM that enables developers to easily create automated integration, functional and acceptance tests for Java middleware.

Getting Started will guide you through the process of creating a simple Dropwizard project: Hello World. Along the way, we’ll explain the various underlying libraries and their roles, important concepts in Dropwizard, and suggest some organizational techniques to help you as your project grows. (Or you can just skip to the fun part.)

The Archive of Interesting Code is an (ambitious) effort on my part to research, intuit, and code up every interesting algorithm and data structure ever invented. In doing so, I hope both to learn the mathematical techniques that power these technologies and to improve my skills as a programmer.

Let's walk through a quick tour of developing apps with Play. Play has idiomatic support for both Java and Scala; this tutorial will start with some Java examples in the first half and move onto Scala for the second half.

Togglz is an implementation of the Feature Toggles pattern for Java. Feature Toggles are a very common agile development practices in the context of continuous deployment and delivery. The basic idea is to associate a toggle with each new feature you are working on. This allows you to enable or disable these features at application runtime, even for individual users.

Maven is a classic contextual tool: it is opinionated, rigid, generic, and dogmatic, which is exactly what is needed at the beginning of a project. Before anything exists, it’s nice for something to impose a structure, and to make it trivial to add behavior via plug-ins and other pre-built niceties. But over time, the project becomes less generic and more like a real, messy project. Early on, when no one knows enough to have opinions about things like lifecycle, a rigid system is good. Over time, though, project complexity requires developers to spawn opinions, and tools like Maven don’t care.

I've been programming since I was 7 years old. My short foray with IDE's (in perspective: 2004-2011/2012) also coincide with my most frustrated period with tooling and languages. I don't think this is a coincidence. Comparing using poor languages (..ehm, Java)requiring tank-like IDE's, with using a more lightweight toolchain with sane languages like Haskell, Clojure and Scala (used correctly) only confirms this.

I can only conclude that the need for an IDE or a heavy "code navigation tool" is a symptom of a deeper problem, if you suffer from tool frustration, it's not necessary your tools that are poor, it may be that your language sucks, or you're not using it correctly.

Nexus manages software “artifacts” required for development, deployment, and provisioning. If you develop software, Nexus can help you share those artifacts with other developers and end-users. Maven’s central repository has always served as a great convenience for users of Maven, but it has always been recommended to maintain your own repositories to ensure stability within your organization. Nexus greatly simplifies the maintenance of your own internal repositories and access to external repositories. With Nexus you can completely control access to, and deployment of, every artifact in your organization from a single location.

The Nexus book.

The Cognitive Foundry is a modular Java software library for the research and development of cognitive systems. It contains many reusable components for machine learning, statistics, and cognitive modeling. It is primarily designed to be easy to plug into applications to provide adaptive behaviors.

The Cognitive Foundry's development is led by Sandia National Laboratories and is released under the open source BSD License.

In this example I will show how you can perform a standard Maven build whilst keeping your unit and integration tests in separate packages.

Other techniques specify using either a naming convention or a separate module to do this. This example allows true package separation and is self contained in a single profile so it can easily be used across projects. Alternative profiles can also be created for different types of test.

This solution lends itself well to generating code coverage metrics using Sonar and Jacoco.

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