A target image is provided as input. The algorithm tries to find the single most optimal shape that can be drawn to minimize the error between the target image and the drawn image. It repeats this process, adding one shape at a time. Around 50 to 200 shapes are needed to reach a result that is recognizable yet artistic and abstract.

Centering in CSS is a pain in the ass. There seems to be a gazillion ways to do it, depending on a variety of factors. This consolidates them and gives you the code you need for each situation.

Let’s harness the power of these new media queries to serve an image of the right size based on the device a user views our site on. We’re going to save a lot of bandwidth for the small devices, and serve a beautiful large image for larger ones.

We’ll do that by using the HTML5 picture element and its powerful source tag and media and srcset attributes.

Have you ever wanted a drag and drop library that just works? That doesn't just depend on bloated frameworks, that has great support? That actually understands where to place the elements when they are dropped? That doesn't need you to do a zillion things to get it to work? Well, so did I!

Making good pagination is not a difficult thing. Really, you just want to remember the following basic guidelines, and you should be fine. We'll look at a large range of examples after that, to see what we can learn from existing pagination designs found on popular websites today.

Piwik is the leading open-source analytics platform that gives you more than just powerful analytics: * Free open-source software * 100% data ownership * User privacy protection * User-centric insights * Customisable and extensible

Nobody has ever implemented an OAuth flow for their application and then said, “That was fun. Let’s do it again.”

Don’t believe me? Just go to Twitter and search for “OAuth Sucks”. Or just search “OAuth”. Or best of all just follow the OAuthSucks Twitter account. It’s a sentiment that’s so common, it has it’s own Twitter account. How did I find this account? I tried to register it of course.

But why is OAuth so awful? And does it have to be this way? In this post, we’ll take a look. OAuth (2.0 specifically) has a litany of problems, starting with the fact that the 2.0 spec itself essentially allows anything to be considered “OAuth compliant”.

I guess the first question is why, why has one style swept across the web design world and been implemented across so many websites? I’ve thought and thought about this and never really come up with a single answer. Initially I looked at the huge theme market that exists where creators sell their themes to any number of customers. The theme market is massive, and as a result creators mimic the best selling work in an effort to make more money. You’re not going to make a lot of money in the theme market by going out on a limb and creating something incredibly unique and personalised. Generic wins out every time.

PostCSS is a tool for transforming CSS with JS plugins. The growing ecosystem of PostCSS plugins can add vendor prefixes, support variables and mixins, transpile future CSS syntax, inline images, and more.

PostCSS is used by Google, Twitter, Alibaba, and Shopify. Its most popular plugin, Autoprefixer, is one of the most universally praised CSS processors available.

PostCSS can do the same work as preprocessors like Sass, Less, and Stylus. But PostCSS is modular, 4-40x faster, and much more powerful.

We have broken HTTP. We’ve done it for years in fits and starts, but apps have completely broken it. HTTP was a good specification which we’ve steadily whittled away.

URLs have a purpose. We are very cavalier about that purpose. We don’t use canonicals. We’re sloppy about switching back and forth between HTTP and HTTPs. We don’t bother to logically structure our URLs. We rebuild websites and let all the links break. We don’t appreciate that crawlers are dumb and they need more context than humans.

The author goes on to complain about the misuse of HTTP methods and status codes as if he had never heard of REST APIs. Overall, though, he makes some good points.

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