Hello! This is part one of a short series of posts on writing a simple raytracer in Rust. I’ve never written one of these before, so it should be a learning experience all around.

This is part one of a short series of posts on writing a simple raytracer in Rust. I’ve never written one of these before, so it should be a learning experience all around.

One way to visualize what goes on is to turn the network upside down and ask it to enhance an input image in such a way as to elicit a particular interpretation. Say you want to know what sort of image would result in “Banana.” Start with an image full of random noise, then gradually tweak the image towards what the neural net considers a banana (see related work in [1], [2], [3], [4]). By itself, that doesn’t work very well, but it does if we impose a prior constraint that the image should have similar statistics to natural images, such as neighboring pixels needing to be correlated.

Profiling data can be thousands of lines long, and difficult to comprehend. Flame graphs are a visualization for sampled stack traces, which data allows hot code-paths to be identified quickly. See the Flame Graphs main page for uses of this visualization other than CPU profiling.

Flame Graphs can work with any CPU profiler on any operating system. My examples here use Linux perf_events, DTrace, SystemTap, and ktap. See the Updates list for other profiler examples, and github for the flame graph software.

In this article we'll explore a neat way of visualizing your MP3 music collection. The end result will be a hexagonal map of all your songs, with similar sounding tracks located next to each other. The color of different regions corresponds to different genres of music (e.g. classical, hip hop, hard rock). As an example, here's a map of three albums from my music collection: Paganini's Violin Caprices, Eminem's The Eminem Show, and Coldplay's X&Y.

Welcome to Labeled Faces in the Wild, a database of face photographs designed for studying the problem of unconstrained face recognition. The data set contains more than 13,000 images of faces collected from the web. Each face has been labeled with the name of the person pictured. 1680 of the people pictured have two or more distinct photos in the data set. The only constraint on these faces is that they were detected by the Viola-Jones face detector. More details can be found in the technical report below.

For years, we’ve known what’s been weighing down our responsive pages: images. Huge ones, specially catered to huge screens, which we’ve been sending to everyone. We’ve known how to fix this problem for a while too: let us send different sources to different clients. New markup allows us to do exactly that. srcset lets us offer multiple versions of an image to browsers, which, with a little help from sizes, pick the most appropriate source to load out of the bunch. picture and source let us step in and exert a bit more control, ensuring that certain sources will be picked based on either media queries or file type support.

Welcome to FlatIcon: the Fastest Tool that Converts Fabulous Icons into Web Fonts.

Glyphr Studio is a free, html5 based font editor.

Font design has a high barrier of entry. Professional font design programs are very complex, and quite expensive. Glyphr Studio is accessible, streamlined, and made for font design hobbyists... and it's free!

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