In an attempt to sell advertising space in a user’s new tab page within the Firefox browser, Mozilla is launching a new platform called “Suggested Tiles” specifically for advertisers. Similar to Google using your Web search history to load related advertisements within Google Adsense placements, Mozilla will look through your visited sites within Firefox to suggest an advertiser site to visit and display it on the new tab page.

However, there are user protections built into the new feature as detailed on Mozilla’s Advancing Content blog. Users will be able to flip off the Suggested Tiles function by toggling a check box within the browser’s settings. Users can also completly avoid site suggestions by opting for a blank page when opening up a new tab within Firefox.

As reported by Cameron McCormack, Firefox Nightly (version 29) now supports CSS variables. You can get a quick overview in this short screencast:

Without the support of two major browsers and major websites most internet users are missing out on the security benefits of perfect forward secrecy. Without the protection of PFS, if an organisation were ever compelled — legally or otherwise — to turn over RSA private keys, all past communication over SSL is at risk. Perfect forward secrecy is no panacea, however; whilst it makes wholesale decryption of past SSL connections difficult, it does not protect against targeted attack on individual sessions. Whether or not PFS is used, SSL remains an important tool for web sites to use to secure data transmission across the internet to protect against (perhaps all but the most well-equipped) eavesdroppers.

rikaichan is a popup Japanese-English/German/French/Russian dictionary extension for Firefox, Thunderbird and Seamonkey.

Features:

* Simple to use, just hover the mouse on top of a Japanese word. * Automatically de-inflects verbs and adjectives. * Has an optional toolbar that allows you to manually type the word to lookup. * Detailed kanji view shows meaning/keyword in English, on/kun readings, and other information. * Hiragana, katakana and half-width katakana are treated the same making it possible to lookup stylized/emphasized words.

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