The fact that any CA can issue a certificate for any domain name is commonly cited as the weakest aspect of the PKI ecosystem. Although CAs want to do the right thing, there are no technical controls that prevent them from doing whatever they chose to do. That’s why we say that the PKI ecosystem is a weak as the weakest link. With hundreds of CAs, there are potentially many weak links.

CAA creates a DNS mechanism that enables domain name owners to whitelist CAs that are allowed to issue certificates for their hostnames. It operates via a new DNS resource record (RR) called CAA (type 257). Owners can restrict certificate issuance by specifying zero or more CAs; if a CA is allowed to issue a certificate, their own hostname will be in the DNS record. For example, this is what someone’s CAA configuration could be (in the zone file):

example.org. CAA 128 issue "letsencrypt.org"

The PCI Council says you must remove completely support for SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0. In short: servers and clients should disable SSL and then preferably transition everything to TLS 1.2.

However, TLS 1.1 can be acceptable if configured properly. The Council points to a NISTpublication that tells you how to do this configuration.

Wifatch’s code does not ship any payloads used for malicious activities, such as carrying out DDoS attacks, in fact all the hardcoded routines seem to have been implemented in order to harden compromised devices. We’ve been monitoring Wifatch’s peer-to-peer network for a number of months and have yet to observe any malicious actions being carried out through it.

Acts as a proxy for incoming webhooks between your Git hosting provider and your continuous integration server.

When a Git commit webhook is received, the repository in question will be mirrored locally (or updated, if it already exists), and then the webhook will be passed on to your CI server, where it can start a build, using the up-to-date local mirror.

So you've installed your certificate, it doesn't use SHA1, your preferred cipher suites use forward secrecy, RC4 is disabled and your site gets an 'A' rating in the SSL Labs handshake test.

Then someone visits your site in Chrome and notices the following:

Your connection to example.com is encrypted with obsolete cryptography.

Hyperfox is a security tool for proxying and recording HTTP and HTTPs communications on a LAN.

Hyperfox is capable of forging SSL certificates on the fly using a root CA certificate and its corresponding key (both provided by the user). If the target machine recognizes the root CA as trusted, then HTTPs traffic can be succesfully intercepted and recorded.

Serf is a tool for cluster membership, failure detection, and orchestration that is decentralized, fault-tolerant and highly available. Serf runs on every major platform: Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows. It is extremely lightweight: it uses 5 to 10 MB of resident memory and primarily communicates using infrequent UDP messages.

OpenDaylight is an open platform for network programmability to enable SDN and NFV for networks at any size and scale. The community’s second release “Helium” comes with a new user interface and a much simpler and customizable installation process thanks to the use of the Apache Karaf container.

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OpenDaylight software is a combination of components including a fully pluggable controller, interfaces, protocol plug-ins and applications. With this common platform both customers and vendors can innovate and collaborate in order to commercialize SDN- and NFV-based solutions.

Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV) is a new open source project focused on accelerating the evolution of Network Functions Virtualization (NFV). OPNFV will establish a carrier-grade, integrated, open source reference platform that industry peers will build together to advance the evolution of NFV and to ensure consistency, performance and interoperability among multiple open source components. Because multiple open source NFV building blocks already exist, OPNFV will work with upstream projects to coordinate continuous integration and testing while filling development gaps.

When Edward Snowden exposed the scale and depth of the National Security Agency's surveillance programs, his findings led to another disheartening revelation: that our Internet has become too centralized. Webmail services like Yahoo and Google and social networks like Facebook and Twitter are convenient and efficient platforms, as well as easy to use, but they collect massive amounts of user data that can facilitate intelligence spying and other types of snooping. Meanwhile, securer methods of communication are often cumbersome and overly technical for the average user who would like to send an email without having to download and set up various software. Yet after Snowden’s leaks, an increasing demand for securer alternatives has led to the development of anti-surveillance products with an eye towards being user friendly.

That is certainly true for Miguel Freitas, a research engineer based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, who decided to create a decentralized alternative to Twitter to counter NSA spying and protect against shutdowns of social media sites; but it would also be “something that my grandmother could use,” Freitas tells techPresident.

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