We tend to see the web as a reactive model, where every action causes a reaction. Users click, then we take them to a new page. They click again, and we open another page. But we can do better. We can be proactive with prebrowsing.

You just replace use Getopt::Long with use Getopt::Long::Complete and your program suddenly supports tab completion. This works for most/many programs.

There’s a strong case to be made that as Facebook and Twitter have amassed such huge user bases we should take advantage of the fact that so many of their users are already logged in and just one click away from entering your app. I know that argument all too well, because I made it to my colleagues. We tried that experiment, and found that while there are some marginal improvements to login failure rate, they come with a price. Do you want to NASCAR-up your login page? Do you want to have your users’ login credentials stored in a third-party service? Do you want your brand closely associated with other brands, over which you have no control? Do you want to add additional confusion about login methods on your app? Is it worth it? Nope, it’s not to us.

Catch common usability problems before user testing.

This page gives a practical example of writing a emacs major mode to do syntax coloring of your own language. You should have few months experience of coding emacs lisp. If you don't know elisp, first take a look at Emacs Lisp Basics.

The short answer is that OpenID is the worst possible "solution" I have ever seen in my entire life to a problem that most people don't really have.  That's what's "wrong" with it.

...

OpenID is not flawed in some minor product way that requires just a few tweaks, it is so massively flawed (perhaps in its very conception) that anyone in their right mind would immediately know that it could never possibly be successful, the very notion that there's merely "something wrong" with it is a Joseph Goebbels -"Big Lie"-style question wherein the nerds who came up with it have somehow been brainwashed into thinking that it could somehow ever be a viable thing that real people would want to adopt.

This article is for those who are new to ARIA. You need an understanding of HTML and the potential difficulties that people with disabilities can face using the Web. It is useful to be familiar with some Rich Internet Applications from a user's perspective

After reading this article, you'll understand what ARIA is for, how to integrate it into your sites, and how you can use it now to make even the simplest of sites more accessible.

See your web design on any browser on any operating system. Check javascripts, DHTML, forms and other dynamic functionality on any platform. Not just yours. Use our bank of testing machines remotely to test your website.

The ubiquity of frustrating, unhelpful software interfaces has motivated decades of research into “Human-Computer Interaction.” In this paper, I suggest that the long-standing focus on “interaction” may be misguided. For a majority subset of software, called “information software,” I argue that interactivity is actually a curse for users and a crutch for designers, and users’ goals can be better satisfied through other means.

Bookmark

10/GUI

10gui.com/, posted 2010 by peter in design inspiration usability video

Over a quarter-century ago, Xerox introduced the modern graphical user interface paradigm we today take for granted.

That it has endured is a testament to the genius of its design. But the industry is now at a crossroads: New technologies promise higher-bandwidth interaction, but have yet to find a truly viable implementation.

10/GUI aims to bridge this gap by rethinking the desktop to leverage technology in an intuitive and powerful way.

1–10 (22)   Next >   Last >|