Greetings fellow Nim adventurers! Below you will find 16 handy Nim tips & tricks I came across while developing a medium-sized GUI program this year, Gridmonger (and related libraries). Some of them are about less known or undocumented Nim features or standard library functions, a few are workarounds for some rough edges of the language, and there’s also a handful of useful techniques I read about in forums or have invented on my own.

The goal of this book is to document commonly-known and lesser-known methods of doing various tasks using only built-in POSIX sh features. Using the snippets from this bible can help remove unneeded dependencies from scripts and in most cases make them faster. I came across these tips and discovered a few while developing KISS Linux and other smaller projects.

As I said, when I got stuck, the problem was never with coding or other technical issues. Of course, understanding every little detail of Flask was difficult sometimes—I was also hunting bugs for hours, sure. But the things that stopped me were mostly mindset related.

So here are a few practical pieces of advice to get over these issues—for my future self and for you—if you want to get a hobby project done!

What's the number one prerequisite to building a high-quality wardrobe? Exactly: You need to be able to recognize a quality garment when you see one. You need to be able to tell the difference between a durable, well-crafted piece and one that looks pretty on the rack but won't last more than half a season. You need to know a) which properties distinguish high-quality garments from low-quality ones, and b) how to recognize these properties when you're out shopping.

To help you do just that, this post and the next one will give you a broad introduction to assessing the quality of garments. We will start with fabrics in this first part and then cover seams, tailoring, linings and details like buttons, zippers and pockets in part II. I will also include a downloadable one-page cheat sheet that summarizes the most important facts in the second post.

If you're setting up a service where people can register their own usernames to be used as a hostname (username.example.com), email address (username@example.com), or URL path (example.com/username) within your domain, there are some common names you should avoid letting the general public register.

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This is a list of all the names I know that should be restricted from registration in automated systems. If you know of others, please let me know and I'll update this page.

In this quick tutorial I want to show you how to generate a deb package from scratch that will install a binary executable in the target system. Let's start off with a bit of theoretical background.

The SSH agent is a central part of OpenSSH. In this post, I'll explain what the agent is, how to use it, and how it works to keep your keys safe. I'll also describe agent forwarding and how it works. I'll help you reduce your risk when using agent forwarding, and I'll share an alternative to agent forwarding that you can use when accessing your internal hosts through bastions.

Avoiding hassle is especially important for a bootstrapped company. As discussed in my previous post about the spiderweb entrepreneur, in the early stages of bootstrapping, nothing happens unless YOU do it, so it’s incredibly important to conserve your time and energy.

Ifyou want to absolutely minimize hassle as you run your software business, you can stick to each one of these rules, which I present in no particular order:

DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) allows a person or organisation to claim responsibility for an email message by associating a domain name with the message.

This is a guide on setting up private apt repository that is accessible over a local network via HTTPS and is signed to avoid having to use –allow-unauthenticated to install packages.

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For my use case I have two distributions of packages, they are production and test distributions. The packages in each distribution varies based on what I have approved to be used in a live/production environment versus a test environment. This is so that I can separate out packages that I am using for normal everyday use versus ones I am currently testing with and not ready to go live with. If you are only using one distribution modify the instructions accordingly.

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